Connect
To Top

FOUR LOVE AND LEGAL LESSONS LEARNED FROM LOVE & HIP HOP NEW YORK SEASON 4

FOUR LOVE & LEGAL LESSONS LEARNED FROM LOVE & HIP HOP NEW YORK SEASON 4

 This season of Love & Hip Hop New York played out like the title of cast member, Brian “Saigon” Carenard’s sophomore album, The Greatest Story Ever Told 2: Bread & Circuses.  We saw Saigon try to work on his relationship with Eric Jean, the mother of his son. Then there was the whole love triangle between rapper-turned-manager Peter Gunz, his wife Amina Buddafly, and Tara Wallace, the mother of his two sons. Joe Budden tried to win Tahiry back.  Yandy embraced the challenges of being a single parent, while her fiancé, Mendeecee Harris was in jail awaiting trial on federal drug trafficking charges. Of course, we cannot forget the Rich Dollaz, Erica Mena and Cyn Santana love triangle.

 Despite all of its drama and craziness, Love & Hip Hop New York Season 4, provided some valuable legal lessons.

 LEGAL LESSON #1  – IT’S ALL IN THE DETAILS

Siagon Release from Atlantic Records Video Clip

 Many of us may not be familiar with Saigon’s professional background prior to Love & Hip Hop. He played aspiring rapper Turtle in HBO’s hit series Entourage. Siagon also signed a record deal with Atlantic Records in 2004. As is common in the music industry, creative differences arose between Siagon and Atlantic. Siagon explained to Billboard, “It’s not that I didn’t want to put out music, but Atlantic wanted me to do ringtone songs, but they didn’t sign me as a ringtone artist.” He added, “That he was left without much support when, the A&R rep who signed him, Kyambo Hip-Hop Joshua left to join Columbia records three months afterwards.” 

 Saigon hired a lawyer to help him get released from his contract with Atlantic. In 2008, after numerous delayed release dates for his debut album, Saigon was finally let go from his contract.  According to Rolling Stone, “Saigon walked away with 100% ownership of his [unreleased] album The Greatest Story Ever Told.”

 Like Saigon, many emerging artist are eager to land that coveted record label deal and fail to scrutinize the contract terms. Some of Saigon’s contract anguish could have been alleviated if he had negotiated a man main clause into his contract. A main man clause stipulates that when a certain individual leaves the record label the contract terminates.

 Even though, an artist signs a recording agreement the record label does not have an obligation to release the artist’s album. Saigon should have had a clause guaranteeing the release of his debut album incorporated into the contract.  Or at the very least, he should have negotiated a clause that allowed him to go to another label if his album was not released.

 Most record label contracts contain work-for-hire clauses, which states all music recorded by the artist is owned by the record label.  It would have been in Saigon’s interest to request a contract clause that allowed him to regain ownership of all the masters he recorded, if he and the record label parted ways. This way he would have still been able to exploit the masters even though he was no longer signed to Atlantic. Thankfully, his lawyer was able to secure this in his release agreement.

 LEGAL LESSON #2 – ASK BEFORE YOU BORROW

 So Tell me where you from

Uptown baby, Uptown baby

We gets down baby, up for the crown baby

 Who can forget the infectious hook from Peter Gunz and Lord Tariq’s hit single “Déjà Vu.” The song’s track contained an unauthorized sample of Steely Dan’s “Black Cow.”  Steely Dan brought a lawsuit against the rap duo and was awarded a six figure settlement. They also received all of the publishing rights to “Déjà Vu” and 90% royalties for the song. As a result, Love & Hip Hop cast member, Peter Gunz has been unable to financially profit from the song.

 Sampling music is common place in the hip-hop industry.  However, under the law, an artist is required to obtain two types of copyrights prior to sampling a song, a sound recording copyright (typically owned by the record label) and a musical composition copyright (owned by the songwriter or publishing company).  The fees to license a song/sample varies greatly.

 The track to “Déjà Vu” was produced by Brian Kierulf and Joshua Schwartz of KNS Productions.  A producer agreement could have helped Peter Gunz and Lord Tariq to avoid the “Déjà Vu” fiasco.  Producer agreements often have clauses requiring the producer to provide proof that any sample used in a track has been cleared. An indemnification clause allows the artist to recover legal fees and cost from the producer if the artist is sued for use of an uncleared sample.

 Check out this clip from the “Classic Albums” documentary series showing Steely Dan’s Donald Fagen singing along to “Déjà Vu” while discussing the making of Black Cow.

 Donald Fagen singing along to Peter Gunz Deja Vu

LOVE LESSON #1 – LOVE IS NOT A YO-YO

 I could not end this blog post without providing a summary of my Secretary, Yvette’s insights on this season of Love & Hip Hop New York. I give the legal and Yvette provides the real.

 Seeing as how today is Valentine’s Day it’s fitting Yvette chose to provide some love advice

 Yvette first love lesson, “When you love someone, you can’t treat them like a yo-yo and use them only when you are in need and then throw them away, and expect them to still be there.”

 LOVE LESSON # 2 – LOVE IS LIKE A FRAGILE PACKAGE

 Yvette’s second love lesson is, “Love is like a fragile package. You must handle it with care. Your goal is not to break it or hurt it and that is how you should strive to treat the person you love at all times.”

 The J. Paye & Associates team wishes you a Happy Valentine’s Day!

Disclaimer: This blog post does not constitute legal advice.  Please consult an entertainment or intellectual property lawyer to discuss your legal needs.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

* Copy This Password *

* Type Or Paste Password Here *

156,807 Spam Comments Blocked so far by Spam Free Wordpress

More in Entertainment